Por qué es importante la toma de conciencia sobre el SIDA

Cada año, durante el mes de diciembre, la comunidad global se une para celebrar el Día Mundial del SIDA, el 1ro de diciembre, y el Mes de toma de conciencia sobre el SIDA. Es una oportunidad única en la que personas de todas partes del mundo unen sus esfuerzos en la batalla continua contra el
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Breast Care Break Down: What You Should Know About Breast Cancer

“1 in 8 women get breast cancer. Today, I’m the one,” wrote actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus just a few weeks ago. All of us know someone – family member, co-worker, friend – who has breast cancer, which is the second most common cancer affecting American women. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month but, as I tell
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Prostate Health: To Screen, or Not to Screen

As every Primary Care Physician knows, men don’t like to go to the doctor. In Latin culture – and I’ve found this to be true with men of many cultures – a false sense of “machismo” gets in the way of having an annual wellness exam and a forthright discussion of symptoms and concerns, especially when it comes talking about sexual health. September is national Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, which serves as an important reminder for men to start a conversation with their doctor about a topic they may be too embarrassed to talk about.

“No Symptoms, No Asthma” and other Dangerous Myths

Too many patients – not to mention parents of asthmatic children – become complacent and neglect to fill their prescription or take their control medicine. This is a big mistake because the most important goal is to prevent the next asthma attack. All too often, patients end up in an emergency room to treat an attack that could have been avoided to begin with. As Asthma Awareness Month comes to a close, let’s debunk some of the common myths shared by many patients.

Don’t Snooze on this Diabetes Wake-Up Call

As New Yorkers, we are more than twice as likely to have diabetes as the average American. New York City health officials have declared diabetes an epidemic. As a neighborhood physician, I can tell you it is never a good time to sleep through the warning signs of diabetes.